Considerations on BVD eradication

International experience indicates systematic, well coordinated programmes have the most success, while voluntary programmes can make good initial progress but ultimately fail. The farming community must buy into any proposed programme. To buy into the programme and create such a demand for BVD control, farmers must first be well informed. It is likely that stemming economic loss and improving productivity will be the primary motivator at individual farm level.

In order to inform the debate in the livestock industry and gain knowledge on how to move forward the control and eradication of BVD in Ireland, The Irish Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine did a study to outline the BVD control programmes which are in place in other countries

The study was based on a review of the scientific literature on BVD control, an online international survey of BVD experts, visits to three countries which have embarked upon or are about to embark on national BVD control programmes, and a stakeholder workshop.

The review of the scientific literature included, a brief synopsis of the relevant clinical implications of BVD, the economic impact of BVD, epidemiological aspects of the disease to its control, and general models of BVD control. An online survey of BVD experts concluded farmers, were considered to have a major input into the decision that lead to the initiation of BVD control. Economic loss at individual farm level was considered the most significant driver in initiating BVD control. The majority of BVD programmes initially started as voluntary control, with 60% of those that commenced as voluntary eventually becoming compulsory.

Detailed studies of BVD eradication were undertaken in Sweden, Germany and Switzerland.

Sweden

The Swedish experience showed that BVD control was demand led. Awareness of the disease was built among farmers. The farmers received a simple consistent message from the various stakeholders. Industry provided both encouragement and indirect compulsion to increase uptake among farmers. The Swedish programme is based on antibody testing.

Germany

A key lesson from the German experience has been the lack of success of voluntary efforts to eradicate BVD. Germany commenced a mandatory BVD eradication programme in 2011, based on virus detection through collecting tissue tag samples at routine tagging. The programme appeared to be legislatively driven.

Switzerland

Switzerland commenced an aggressive BVD eradication scheme in 2008, based on virus detection on tissue tag testing. The programme required a lot of resources and while farmers made a significant contribution the state had a very significant contribution. The Swiss experience emphasised the need for an integrated real time database, and proactive programme coordination and management at the highest level.

The technical knowledge and test technology exists to eradicate BVD. The identification and prompt elimination of persistently infected (PI) cattle is the basis of any control programme. The trade of such animals must be curtailed.

International experience indicates systematic, well coordinated programmes have the most success, while voluntary programmes can make good initial progress but ultimately fail. The farming community must buy into any proposed programme. To buy into the programme and create such a demand for BVD control, farmers must first be well informed. It is likely that stemming economic loss and improving productivity will be the primary motivator at individual farm level.

Source: Proceedings World Buiatrics Congress 2012

Abstract: Considerations on BVD eradication for the Irish livestock industry
Authors: Barrett , D.; More S.; Graham D.; O’flaherty J.; Doherty M.; Gunn M.
Dept of Agriculture, Food and Marine, Ireland

Milkproduction.com

Milkproduction.com

Source

Source: Proceedings World Buiatrics Congress 2012
Abstract: Considerations on BVD eradication for the Irish livestock industry
Authors: Barrett , D.; More S.; Graham D.; O’flaherty J.; Doherty M.; Gunn M.
Dept of Agriculture, Food and Marine, Ireland